The photography of William Eggleston

A native Southerner raised on a cotton plantation in the Mississippi Delta, Eggleston has created a singular portrait of his native South since the late 1960s. After discovering photography in the early 1960s, he abandoned a traditional education and instead learned from photographically illustrated books by Walker Evans, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and Robert Frank. Although he began his career making black-and-white images, he soon abandoned them to experiment with color technology to record experiences in more sensual and accurate terms at a time when color photography was largely confined to commercial advertising. In 1976 with the support of John Szarkowski, the influential photography historian, critic, and curator, Eggleston mounted “Color Photographs” a now famous exhibition of his work at the Museum of Modern Art, New York. William Eggleston’s Guide , in which Szarkowski called Eggleston’s photographs “perfect,” accompanied this groundbreaking one-person show that established his reputation as a pioneer of color photography. His subjects were mundane, everyday, often trivial, so that the real subject was seen to be color itself. These images helped establish Eggleston as one of the first non-commercial photographers working in color and inspired a new generation of photographers, as well as filmmakers. 

Eggleston has published his work extensively. He continues to live and work in Memphis, and travels considerably for photographic projects. (x)


Gianni Pettena

Gianni Pettena

I had asked Jolie a few days ago if I could fly with her, and she told me she had never taken a passenger up before but would think about it. When I arrived at the photo shoot, I told her that I mentioned to my mother that I might fly with her and that my mother did not like the idea one bit. Jolie laughed it off. Now, as I am watching her kick off her stilettos (she pilots barefoot) and step up onto the wing of her little white plane, she stops for a second and stares at me standing off to the side. There is a glint in her eye. A big smile spreads across her face. “Let’s go scare your mother,” she says.

Only as I am jammed in the back next to Leibovitz, bumping along the dinky little runway, does the reality of what I’m doing sink in. I imagine the headline: ANGELINA JOLIE AND ANNIE LEIBOVITZ DIE IN PLANE CRASH NEAR LAS VEGAS. I try to remember who went down with Patsy Cline, but I can’t. I am about to become a trivia question. I tell myself this will be a suitably fabulous way to die, and just like that we are in the air, floating above the desert, and my nerves are gone. “I’ll do some tight turns,” says Jolie. “Maddox likes it when there are g-forces.” [x]

adventuretimewithlewis:

The gays are angry

adventuretimewithlewis:

The gays are angry

mrgolightly:

drackiszunk:

willcub:

So many of you are too young to remember why Diana, Princess of Wales, was such a remarkable person.  She pissed off most of Buckingham Palace, was her own woman, and wasn’t afraid to get down out of the motorcade and be with the regular people.

She was a regular person, just with a title and fancy clothes.  

Among the first big “names” to visit, talk to, and even touch those dying of AIDS in English hospitals, Diana’s trademark was her ability to break down insurmountable barriers.

If she were still living I guarantee she’d be crazily bad ass.

If she were still living, she would literally be President of the World.

asylum-art:

Neon Sign Installations by Olivia Steele

Based in Berlin, Olivia Steele is an artist who uses light and neons to add meaning and irony to a place. She creates spiritual baselines we can interpret as we want, by working a lot on typography and the style of her letters. Her work is to discover in bars, in cities and on photographs.

cleavingmind:

joshuapollina:

Via @tempster_returns


Dannnnno

cleavingmind:

joshuapollina:

Via @tempster_returns

Dannnnno

Heathers (1988)

Me

Me

If African American and Hispanics were incarcerated at the same rates of whites, today’s prison and jail populations would decline by approximately 50%.
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